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Category — Vancouver

Canada: Vancouver’s Sole Food Street Farms to move to new home in Olympic Village

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Site plan for the new location of the Sole Food Urban Street Farm at West 1st Avenue and Crowe Street. Credit: City of Vancouver Click through to article to see larger detailed image.

North America’s largest urban farm is preparing to move south across False Creek, from their current home at Pacific and Carrall, to a new spot in the Olympic Village.

By Peter Meiszner
Urban YVR
October 16, 2017

Excerpt:

Sole Food needs to move nearly 2,000 planter boxes to the new site by the end of October. Three shipping containers will also be set up on the property to house supplies and office space for the operation.

Produce from the farm will be processed on-site for distribution through farmers markets, delivery to restaurants and also sold on-site. Operating hours will be from dawn to dusk, seven days a week, and the farm will be open to the public Monday-Friday 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.

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October 17, 2017   No Comments

Canada: Urbanite Finds Success Growing Organic Choy for Vancouver Market

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Caroline Chiu is an organic farmer who has found success growing Chinese vegetables. Photo by Jennifer Gauthier / For Metro.

In fact, more than 90 per cent of produce grown in the Lower Mainland in the 1920s was cultivated by Chinese farmers in a system segregated by racist policies of the time, according to historian Kay Anderson, author of Vancouver’s Chinatown.

By Wanyee Li
Metro
Oct 06 2017

Excerpt:

Farming wasn’t the dream career Caroline Chiu’s parents had in mind for their daughter but the budding entrepreneur has found that organic Chinese veggies are a hit in Vancouver.

The 28-year-old started her half-an-acre farm in Richmond, called Riverside Farm, after completing farm school at Kwantlen Polytechnic University two years ago. She tapped into her own commnunity to find success in Vancouver’s rapidly growing local-food scene.

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October 7, 2017   No Comments

Canada: Vancouver’s Sole Food Street Farms Takes On Poverty With Urban Agriculture

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Click image to see larger file. “One of the things we love most about urban farming is the chance to bring colour and life to unexpected places.”

It’s one of the largest of its kind in North America.

By Lois Abraham
Canadian Press
09/18/2017

Excerpt:

The crops grow in 10,000 specially designed containers on what were once vacant lots.

The urban farm, one of the largest in North America, has helped deal with the chronic problems in the community.

“You walk down Hastings Street in the middle of the afternoon and see somebody on the sidewalk with a needle in their arm or somebody else kind of pirouetting in the middle of the street high on crack and you make judgements. We all do,” says Ableman.

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September 24, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: Vancouver’s Sole Food Street Farms Takes On Poverty With Urban Agriculture

Cornelia Hahn Oberlander: The Benefit of Nature in High Density Urban Areas

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We must keep every scrap of nature in and around our cities. Nature holds the key to our aesthetic, intellectual, cognitive and even spiritual satisfaction.
– E.O. Wilson in The Biophilia Hypothesis (1984)

By Cornelia Hahn Oberlander, Project Director
and Deanne Manzer, Project Researcher MLA
and Kaitlyn Gillis, Project Advisor
June 26, 2017
(Must see.) Mike

Excerpt:

Greening Strategies

– Every home within a 5 min walk to a greenspace
– Restore or enhance 25ha of natural areas
– 30ha of additional public park – 20,000 trees planted
– 200 public greening projects
– 100 ha of green roofs and
walls, including 33 ha dedicated to urban agriculture
– 200 ha of skyrise greenway (1/2 the size of Stanley park)
– 400km of park connectors – 0.8ha of parkland / 1,000
residents

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September 15, 2017   Comments Off on Cornelia Hahn Oberlander: The Benefit of Nature in High Density Urban Areas

Canada: B.C. gardeners dig into yard-sharing

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Rose Dykstra in the front yard of her Vancouver home on Aug. 5. Dykstra uses her front yard, and that of a neighbour, to grow flowers for her business, Front Yard Flower Co. By Jason Payne.

Regular homeowners who want to share their space with non-commercial gardeners can use the Young Agrarians U-Map to offer up their yards, and gardeners can look at the existing land listings.

By Randy Shore
Vancouver Sun
Aug 8, 2017

Excerpt:

Both Dykstra and Single-Dain lamented the existence of a dedicated Vancouver website for homeowners and gardeners interested in yard-sharing. Victoria-based LifeCycles Project hosted a yard-sharing website at sharingbackyards.com for several years and had expanded it to 58 cities before the platform collapsed.

“We were running without funding and I tried to write some grant applications while I scaled up,” said former project leader Chris Hawkins. “After the economic collapse it just got harder and harder to get grants, especially as we weren’t regarded as a startup.”

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August 9, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: B.C. gardeners dig into yard-sharing

The Vancouver Resident’s Guide to Alternative Gardening

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City Beet Urban Farm in Mount Pleasant by Ruth Hartnup.

According to City Hall, there are over 110 community gardens within the City of Vancouver which can be found on city-owned land, at churches, at schools, and on private property.

By Jay Banks
Vancouver Homes
July 25, 2017

Excerpt:

Another option the City has been actively promoting for gardeners is the option to plant on City land in places like boulevards and traffic circles. As O’Neill explains, any resident who has a boulevard in front of their property is encouraged to use that space for growing both edible and ornamental plants.

The boulevard is defined as the place between the curb and the sidewalk. For those who don’t have access to a boulevard, another option could be to become a volunteer with the Green Streets program, which allows volunteers to plant gardens in traffic calming areas such as traffic circles and bulges.

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July 27, 2017   Comments Off on The Vancouver Resident’s Guide to Alternative Gardening

Canada: Fire Destroys Community Garden Shed in Heart of Vancouver

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Click image to see larger file.

We have no fire insurance. We don’t know how the fire started; the fire department called it “suspicious.”

From Go Fund Me site:

Excerpt:

At 2 am on July 3,2017 there was a fire at Cottonwood Community Gardens and our greenhouse and the attached tool/bee shed burnt to the ground. Many of the nearby plants, shrubs and trees were burned and scorched and may not survive the damage.

Nothing was salvageable from the fire and apart from the building itself, the largest loss is the beekeeping supplies. These include a community honey extractor, protective clothing for lessons and beekeeping tools, boxes and frames. We have a thriving apiary and a thriving bee team. Strathcona Beekeepers Association and the Cottonwood Beekeeping Coop are two of the groups that use the garden.

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July 8, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: Fire Destroys Community Garden Shed in Heart of Vancouver

Pop-up Ping Pong comes to the Vancouver Compost Garden

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Ping-pong has the unique ability to create a conversation between two people through the action of play.

The concept by Ellie Arkin and Renée Miles
Frida&Frank
2017

At Frida&Frank we want to change people’s perspectives on public space, mostly through new experiences and by focussing on creating playful and social ties with and within spaces. With the concept Pop-Up Ping-Pong: The Tables Have Turned we invite people to get involved in redesigning public spaces, which touches on an important aspect of our vision; public space is a playground for people. The design of spaces could be in the hands of people using the space more, and that’s why we want people to turn that table with our concept. Through offering the possibility to create a ping-pong table out of several pieces of wood, participants will experience a sense of belonging and ownership as well as form social ties to the space.

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July 4, 2017   Comments Off on Pop-up Ping Pong comes to the Vancouver Compost Garden

Canada: Greenhouse in a Train – Design Idea for Vancouver’s Arbutus Greenway

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We actually ended up winning the Audience Choice Award for the most exciting project

Post by Iva Jankovic
Her Blog
July 1, 2017

Our final project challenged us to come up with a conceptual redesign of a park space by applying principles of biophyllic design, prospect-refuge theory, and environmental psychology, with the goal to maximize public health benefit.

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July 4, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: Greenhouse in a Train – Design Idea for Vancouver’s Arbutus Greenway

Canada: Vancouver Urban Farming Census 2014 – 2016

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Four farms contributed data on the number of people who engaged with their farms in 2016. 14,943 people came to these four farms throughout 2016 for field trips, summer camps, celebration programs, workshops and other public events.

Marcela Crowe, Project Lead & Researcher
Marc Schutzbank, Project Consultant & Writer
Shauna MacKinnon, Project Consultant & Writer
Lisa Rilkoff, Graphic Designer
A project of the Vancouver Urban Farming Society (VUFS)
June 2017
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpts:

These farms grow! From 2010 to 2016 the sales value from urban farms grew more than five-fold from $129,000 in annual sales to $746,000. Sales to restaurants have been the leading growth area with sales increasing from $13,400 in 2010 to $390,400 in 2016. In 2013, high sales volumes corresponded with greater land under production. In 2016, two of the top three farms were indoor operations with a footprint of 4,000 sq ft or less.

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June 5, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: Vancouver Urban Farming Census 2014 – 2016

Vancouver Urban Sketchers Visit City Farmer

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By Junichi.

Ten of us from the Vancouver Urban Sketchers arrived at City Farmer in Kitsilano for a couple hours of careful observation.

Sketcher’s Blog
May 29, 2017
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

Vancouver enjoyed warm temperatures and blue skies this weekend. Beaches were packed. Bicycles were busy on the streets and pathways. Shops and patios were full. It was perfect for a quiet afternoon getaway into the garden with a sketchbook . . .

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May 30, 2017   Comments Off on Vancouver Urban Sketchers Visit City Farmer

British Columbia boasts the highest proportion of female farmers in Canada, according to 2016 agriculture census

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Elana Evans (left) and Maddy Clerk (right) operate City Beet Farm in Vancouver. (City Beet Farm)

Urban farming and women

By Belle Puri
CBC
May 12, 2017

Excerpt:

City Beet Farm is a commitment between the two farmers and a community of homeowners.

The pair grow a wide diversity of vegetables and flowers on 16 properties in the city.

Homeowners receive a weekly box of vegetables in exchange for the use of their land.

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May 13, 2017   Comments Off on British Columbia boasts the highest proportion of female farmers in Canada, according to 2016 agriculture census

Vancouver’s Indigenous community fights to save native plants at risk

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Lori Snyder believes that indigenous plants should be incorporated into daily diets to improve lifestyle (Sharon Nadeem)

Indigenous herbalists are working to preserve their traditional sources of food and medicine

By Sharon Nadeem, Seher Asaf,
CBC News
May 07, 2017

Excerpt:

A tiny park in central Vancouver surrounded by skyscrapers, a stadium and a concrete parking lot looks like the kind of place that would be hostile to indigenous plants.

But to Métis herbalist Lori Snyder, Hinge Park is a “treasure trove.” She visits the park to fill her basket with indigenous plants, and conducts tours to share her knowledge of traditional medicines.

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May 12, 2017   Comments Off on Vancouver’s Indigenous community fights to save native plants at risk

Cannabis plants spotted growing at Vancouver City Hall community garden promptly removed after report

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On April 24, Ian Young photographed cannabis plants growing in this planter at the Vancouver City Hall community garden. When the Straight went to the garden to confirm that the plants were there, they had already been removed. Photo by Amanda Siebert.

“I want to live in a country where you see cannabis growing in somebody’s front yard, and it’s not a big deal,” he said.

By Amanda Siebert
Georgia Straight
April 25th, 2017

Excerpt:

The campaign calls on “all freedom-loving Canadians to grow a cannabis victory garden” and, in instructions posted on OverGrow Canada’s website, Larsen suggests that these seeds be planted “at City Hall, in front of the local police station, in storefront planters, and other highly visible places.”

“I hope [the plants] are from our campaign, but I know we’re not the only ones with the same idea,” Larsen told the Straight by phone this afternoon. “Regardless, if they’re my seeds or someone else’s, I hope that it keeps happening.”

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May 3, 2017   Comments Off on Cannabis plants spotted growing at Vancouver City Hall community garden promptly removed after report

Vancouver, BC, community gardens – a gift from developers who get tax break

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Chris Reid is the executive director at Shifting Growth, which sets up community gardens in undeveloped properties throughout the Lower Mainland. Reid is pictured Saturday, April 8, 2017 at the Alma community garden in Vancouver, B.C. Jason Payne / PNG

An unexpected offshoot of the initiative is the success of their pre-fab raised garden boxes, which are set on pallets for drainage

By Denise Ryan
Vancouver Sun
Apr 14, 2017

Excerpt:

“The site has been empty for many years and we thought this would be a great way to give back to the community and do something useful while we go through the development process,” said Kevin Cheung, Landa’s CEO in a statement.

Shifting Growth doesn’t solicit developers because there are enough developers willing to assume the risk and responsibility for the garden projects in exchange for a tax break from the B.C. Assessment Authority. If a vacant lot houses a temporary community garden it will be taxed at a lower rate than on a business site.

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April 15, 2017   Comments Off on Vancouver, BC, community gardens – a gift from developers who get tax break