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Category — Vancouver

Real estate speculation threatens future of Metro Vancouver farmland

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KPU studies agriculture real estate speculation as it threatens the future of an economically viable bioregion in Richmond and Southwest B.C.

By Graeme Wood
Richmond News
April 22, 2016

Excerpt:

Presently, about one-third of farmed land in Metro Vancouver is leased.

Furthermore, Mullinix estimates some 44,000 acres of farmable land is not in production in Metro Vancouver.

Adding to the pressures is the increase in estate homes being built on ALR land. Such mansions are numerous in Richmond and set a new price benchmark based on its value as a luxury residential property instead of a working farm, according to the report.

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April 23, 2016   No Comments

The executive director of the Vancouver Urban Farming Society talks about this emerging sector

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marcMarcela Crowe, at an urban farm at 57th and Cambie, said the Vancouver Urban Farming Society’s mandate is to grow the sector through education, advocacy, business support and networking. Photo Dan Toulgoet.

On the Record with Marcela Crowe: In 2013, urban farmers sold about $418,000 worth of produce to residents.

By Naoibh O’Connor
Vancouver Courier
April 12, 2016

Excerpt:

What does urban farming look like in Vancouver right now?
The data needs to be updated. We don’t have any data for 2016 or even 2015. But we do have data from 2013. That was the last time a large census of urban farms in Vancouver took place. This will have changed, but there are approximately 14 urban farms in Vancouver. The largest one [Sole Food Street Farms] has about four acres of land. [That goes] all the way to maybe a handful of backyard farms totalling 5,000 square feet. There’s really that variety in terms of scale. In 2013, urban farmers sold about $418,000 worth of produce to residents. The farms are located throughout the city. They’re in the Downtown Eastside, they’re in Mount Pleasant, they’re in the east end and they’re in the West Side, Kitsilano area.

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April 13, 2016   Comments Off on The executive director of the Vancouver Urban Farming Society talks about this emerging sector

City Farmer’s Head Gardener, Sharon Slack, Makes Vancouver Newspaper Frontpage Twice in 6 weeks

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Sharon Slack, 73, says she prefers working at City Farmer in Kisilano to the typical retirement ‘image’ sold in advertisements. Photo by Arlen Redekop.

“Unretired seniors are working overtime”

By Denise Ryan
The Vancouver Sun
April 8, 2016

Except:

Sharon Slack, 73, head gardener at City Farmer in Kitsilano, said she finds the traditional idea of retirement preposterous.

“The whole image they sell you about retirement — all those TV ads that say: Retire! Do all the things you want to do! Travel! Entertain! Good grief,” she said. “I didn’t do that when I was young. Why in the world would I do it now?”

Slack loves her job, but work isn’t just a pleasure — it’s also a practical matter, she said.

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April 8, 2016   Comments Off on City Farmer’s Head Gardener, Sharon Slack, Makes Vancouver Newspaper Frontpage Twice in 6 weeks

Vancouver, BC community garden to make way for condo development

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This may be the last spring for a Vancouver community garden in Southeast False Creek.

By Carlito Pablo
Georgia Straight
March 30th, 2016

Excerpt:

According to Brock, temporary gardens play an important role.

“There’s a shortage of urban growing space in the city,” he said, “and so we serve that function of giving people who might not have growing space an opportunity to plant.”

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April 1, 2016   Comments Off on Vancouver, BC community garden to make way for condo development

City of Vancouver holds a rain barrel sale

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Quench the thirst of your plants with free water from a rain barrel

City of Vancouver
Engineering/Water Design/Conservation
March 2016

Benefits of rain barrels

The water they collect gives you a source of chlorine-free, slightly-acidic, ambient-temperature water that’s great for your garden.

They reduce your demand for treated drinking water that’s often in short supply in the summer.

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March 30, 2016   Comments Off on City of Vancouver holds a rain barrel sale

Vancouver Tree Book: A Living City Field Guide

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More than 110 of Vancouver’s important species are profiled.

By David Tracey
Pure Wave Media
(March 15, 2016)
240 pages

Trees tell the story of a city, and Vancouver has one of the world’s greatest urban forests. Vancouver Tree Book is the key to a living laboratory unlike anywhere else on Earth.

Slim enough to fit into a pocket yet filled with detailed descriptions and hundreds of colour images, this Living City Field Guide is designed for outdoor use. Bring it with you anywhere you go to discover the quiet giants living among us. Maps to ten Tree Tour walks will help you get going.

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March 26, 2016   Comments Off on Vancouver Tree Book: A Living City Field Guide

Community gardens are scarce in Burnaby and Surrey, British Columbia, report says

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rnsuurSee video online.

Surrey Councillor Mike Starchuk, who chairs the agricultural committee, said conditions in Vancouver are much different.

By Kent Spencer
Vancouver Sun
March 22, 2016

Excerpt:

The study reported that Burnaby and Surrey have six community gardens apiece on civic land, while Vancouver has 45.

“Other cities don’t like to be compared to Vancouver. They think it makes them look bad,” said Rice. “Surrey doesn’t have anywhere near enough community gardens for its size. Burnaby has also lagged.”

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March 22, 2016   Comments Off on Community gardens are scarce in Burnaby and Surrey, British Columbia, report says

Leila Trickey: Portrait of an urban farmer in Burnaby, BC

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LielLeila Trickey grew up on a farm in Ontario. She spent her childhood roaming wide open spaces. Decades later, she runs an urban farm with her partner in Burnaby’s Big Bend area.

Everything grows well in our garden, because it used to be a chicken farm, so the soil is really rich from the chicken poo.

By Jennifer Moreau
Burnaby Now
March 10, 2016

Excerpt:

You could say farming is in Leila Trickey’s genes. Her homesteader parents and five siblings lived on an Ontario farm, and her childhood was shaped by wide open spaces and fresh earth. When Trickey grew up, she moved to more urban pastures, but she still felt a nostalgia for the land.

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March 11, 2016   Comments Off on Leila Trickey: Portrait of an urban farmer in Burnaby, BC

Backyard chickens are becoming increasingly popular in Metro Vancouver, BC

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chik2 Click here to watch the video. Jaydeen Williams keeps chickens — Hennifer Grey (Blue Orpington) and Lambchop (Wheaton Ameracana) — in her backyard in East Vancouver. Photograph by: Arlen Redekop, PNG

When Vancouver city councillors OK’d backyard chickens in 2010, just 13 people stepped forward to register hens. At least 220 other residents have since taken up the hobby, and with new registrations coming in at a record-breaking pace.

By Matthew Robinson
Vancouver Sun
March 6, 2016

Excerpt:

Many jurisdictions around the province allow backyard chickens, including the City of North Vancouver, New Westminster, Squamish, Victoria and a handful of other Vancouver Island municipalities.

Their ranks could soon swell with West Vancouver councillors scheduled to hear residents’ thoughts Monday on a policy that would permit up to six chickens per lot in the district. Surrey councillors are slated to debate their own policy this spring.

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March 7, 2016   Comments Off on Backyard chickens are becoming increasingly popular in Metro Vancouver, BC

It’s time to go back to the land/backyard and grow/hunt/fish-for your own food

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hunt
You’ll need a number of items to gear up for hunting and fishing.

It turns out that women are the fastest-growing class of new hunters in British Columbia and have been for a decade, driven by a renewed interest in back-to-the-land self-sufficiency.

By Randy Shore
Vancouver Sun
Mar 5, 2016

Excerpt:

“People in the city are really engaged with hunting for food and building the skills they need,” said hunting instructor Dylan Eyers of Eat Wild (eatwild.ca). “I run 10 CORE (see graphic) classes a year and they always sell out.”

In order to become a successful hunter, certain financial, physical and psychological barriers must be overcome. Gutting and disarticulating a large mammal in the field takes skill and emotional balance. Hauling a carcass out of the bush takes physical strength. And you’ll need a truck to get it home.

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March 6, 2016   Comments Off on It’s time to go back to the land/backyard and grow/hunt/fish-for your own food

Canada: A National Strategy For Urban Agriculture

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natstatgy Click on image for larger file.

Canada’s Minister of Agriculture comments on City Farmer’s plan “I will certainly consider the recommendations you have outlined in the enclosed publication as I pursue my mandate.” Laurence MacAulay

By Michael Levenston
City Farmer Executive Director
March 3, 2016
15 page booklet (10MB file)

Thirty-six years ago in 1980, City Farmer sent copies of its newspaper to Canada’s Members of Parliament to introduce them to the subject of urban agriculture. In January, 2016, we sent Federal Cabinet Ministers a 15 page booklet outlining a proposal which asks the new Government to consider setting up a National Office of Urban Agriculture.

“It’s a new year and time to put in place a program that will benefit all Canadians. We hope you will consider Canada: A National Strategy for Urban Agriculture as a worthy project for your new government. I’m certain it will be well received by Canadians who want to eat better, care for our environment, and improve our general well being.”

Canada’s Minister of Agriculture, Laurence MacAulay, wrote back expressing his appreciation for our work and commented positively about our plan “I will certainly consider the recommendations you have outlined in the enclosed publication as I pursue my mandate.”

Excerpt from the City Farmer booklet:

Over 26 million Canadians live in 147 metropolitan areas and agglomerations across the country with populations that range from 5,600,000 people in Toronto to 10,500 in Bay Roberts, Newfoundland.

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March 3, 2016   Comments Off on Canada: A National Strategy For Urban Agriculture

New Vancouver, BC, bylaws will regulate urban farmers

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Small-scale farms have sprung up around the region, boosted by community agriculture programs that allow farmers to sell crops in advance.

Intention is to encourage growth of farming, not inhibit it, city says

By Matthew Robinson
Vancouver Sun
February 25, 2016

Excerpt:

Camil Dumont, the head farmer at Inner City Farms said the proposed regulations could help standardize the industry.

“I think most of the people in the community that do urban food production are pretty on the ball, but it only takes one group to do something untoward for everyone to feel the brunt of it. From that perspective, I think it’s pretty good. It gives us a bit of a safety net,” he said.

“The fear is that it’s going to restrict the community from growing as much food as possible. … I want urban farming to be a vibrant and healthy part of our city and hopefully this is something that helps.”

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February 27, 2016   Comments Off on New Vancouver, BC, bylaws will regulate urban farmers

City Farmer’s head gardener, Sharon Slack, cover girl in Vancouver newspaper today

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CoverSharon

Sharon Slack, head gardener at City Farmer, has never counted the savings during 50 years’ endeavours at her Dunbar garden.

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February 26, 2016   Comments Off on City Farmer’s head gardener, Sharon Slack, cover girl in Vancouver newspaper today

Vancouver, BC – There’s money in that pile of dirt: Increasing food prices point to more grow-your-own

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SharGArd
According to Sharon Slack, head gardener at City Farmer: ‘It’s not about how much money I can save, but how much food I can grow.’ Photograph by: Jason Payne , PRV. Click on image for larger file.

Time to dig and plant as prices of imported produce stay sky high Now’s the time to start that backyard garden

By Kent Spencer
The Province
February 25, 2016

Excerpt:

Sharon Slack, head gardener at City Farmer, has never counted the savings during 50 years’ endeavours at her Dunbar garden.

“It’s not about how much money I can save, but how much food I can grow,” she said.

“You can never know about cost savings because every year is different — the weather, the bugs and the amount of time you can devote to it,” she said.

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February 25, 2016   Comments Off on Vancouver, BC – There’s money in that pile of dirt: Increasing food prices point to more grow-your-own

Vancouver, BC, urban farm bylaw to regulate growing industry

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Under the new bylaw, residential urban farmers will be required to pay a $10 licensing fee. [Allotment with Sunflower, Paris, July 1887 Vincent van Gogh] Click on image for larger file.

Urban farms in Vancouver sold $418,000 worth of produce to residents in 2013, according to the city.

By The Early Edition
CBC News
Feb 23, 2016

Excerpt:

The proposed amendments to zoning and business license by-laws will split urban farms into two categories: residential and commercial.

Residential farmers will be required to apply for a $10 license.

Commercial urban farms will have to undergo a more lengthy process that includes obtaining a development permit and submitting a farm management plan.

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February 24, 2016   Comments Off on Vancouver, BC, urban farm bylaw to regulate growing industry