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Tokyo: Mirai Corporation uses vertical farming

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Grant Imahara visits Tokyo and meets with the group at Mirai, whose goal is to bring farm-fresh food to the middle of one of the busiest cities on the planet.

Also see Mouser’s 40 page ebook on Vertical Farming

Mouser.com
2017

Excerpt from book:

Fast-forward to the 20th Century, and the evolution of vertical farming accelerates, drawing on human need, land availability, and industrial advancements. By March 4, 1909, when Life Magazine published what is now known as the first vertical farm illustration, the concept included an open-air building with vertically stacked “vertical homesteads” that cultivated food for consumption.

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August 15, 2017   No Comments

Meet a Woman Who Keeps 500 Plants in Her Brooklyn Apartment

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Oakes with one of her hundreds of plants.

For 11 years, Oakes has lived in a 1,200-square-foot converted industrial space in Williamsburg, which is filled with 500 plants, including a living wall, an irrigated vertical garden constructed out of mason jars, and, in a closet garden, edible plants ranging from the familiar (herbs, greens) to the exotic (a pineapple plant, curry leaves—the latter of which she raves about).

By Dan Nosowitz on July 14, 2016
Photographs by Aliza Eliazarov
Modern Farmer
July 14, 2016

Excerpt:

Her apartment is an attempt to cram a country house into a Brooklyn apartment. None of that is really possible in the city, but Oakes does her best: a vermiculture kit beneath the kitchen sink, a compost bin, LED lighting systems, a sub-irrigation system for certain plants, and plants, plants everywhere. Succulents line the bathroom. An old sled on which her pots and pans are hung also include low-light-tolerant philodendrons.

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August 14, 2017   No Comments

New Zealand: Sikh Temple opens up acres of land for community garden project

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From left: Raju Ramakrishna from Healthy Families Manukau with Gurnoor Kaur and Rajinder Singh Sekhon at the Takanini Sikh Temple community garden.

Takanini Sikh Temple has opened up 11 acres of land to grow fresh fruit and vegetables in Auckland.

By Nigel Moffiet
Stuff
August 7 2017

Excerpt:

The plan is to have up to 400 fruit trees such as lemons, limes, oranges, guava, and a variety of nuts and vegetables grown and maintained by temple members.

The Healthy Families Manukau, Manurewa-Papakura team and the Old School Reserve Teaching Gardens are working with the temple to teach food production skills as part of the project.

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August 14, 2017   No Comments

‘cityfarmer.com’ now available for $23,400 !

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“Please note that Premium Domain Names are registered on a first-come, first-served basis. There are no guarantees that the domain name(s) will be available when you go to the Network Solutions website.”

By Michael Levenston
City Farmer Society
Aug 13, 2017
Note. We do not own ‘cityfarmer.com’.
Registered to Uniregistrar Corp.(PRIVACYDOTLINK CUSTOMER 665476
Street:PO BOX 30485
City:SEVEN MILE BEACH
State:GRAND CAYMAN
See owner information here.

When we started our website in 1994, we chose to purchase ‘cityfarmer.org’ because we are a non-profit. We noted that at some point the .com site was purchased by a commercial entity, but nothing was ever published using that domain name.

We later purchased ‘cityfarmer.info’ to emphasize our news function. Then this last year, we were given the ‘cityfarmer.eco’ name by the Vancouver fellows who administer that domain. We are using it to celebrate our coming 40th anniversary and are featuring our demonstration garden.

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August 13, 2017   No Comments

How learning to farm on other planets could help us on our own

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Growing food on inhospitable planets may no longer be the stuff of fiction, such as in the Disney film Wall-e.

“There is actually a lot of crossover.” Says Gioia Massa, NASA researcher, of both techniques used in urban farms and their research.

By Danielle Crowley
Farmer’s Journal
06 August 2017

Excerpt:

This October, a shipping container called Eden ISS will arrive at the Neumayer III polar station in Antarctica. The plan is to grow around 40 different plants in it, such as basil and strawberries. While not the first greenhouse on Antarctica, this one has a special purpose. Space agencies will be monitoring it in order to get an idea of the challenges that must be overcome to grow food in a harsh, inhospitable environment. The one in mind – Mars.

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August 13, 2017   No Comments

UK: Police help transform overgrown allotment into peaceful community garden

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Durahm Police help transform overgrown allotment into peaceful community garden in Deneside, Seaham.

“Anti-social behaviour has gone right down. There is a real community spirit now. That was always our aim.”

The Northern Echo
Aug 4, 2017

Excerpt:

PCSO Aimee Guest, who works closely with DAG, said: “They have completely transformed the overridden area into a peaceful oasis for the community.

“They continue to inspire me by their initiative and drive to create change for the good of the local people. I am extremely proud. It can now become the heart of the estate. It is open to all.”

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August 13, 2017   No Comments

Returning to the land: Urban gardeners in Pittsburgh hope to put vacant lots to good use

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The group, called the Black Urban Gardeners and Farmers of Pittsburgh Cooperative — or BUGS, for short — is preparing to cultivate the neglected land with all kinds of organic fruits, vegetables and herbs, including peppers, squashes, cabbage, collard greens.

By Jake Flannick
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Aug 5, 2017

Excerpt:

A grass-roots group of gardeners and community activists is turning two overgrown lots in Homewood into an urban farm, seeking to expand access to healthy food and improve the collective well-being of this once-fertile neighborhood.

“We’ll always be growing food,” said Dana Harris-Yates, a shaman medicine woman who uses “AL” after her name, a Moorish title indicating “one who mastered psychology and healing.” She is a program manager for the BUGS group and is overseeing the Homewood project.

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August 12, 2017   No Comments

Cows and goats take residence in Tokyo high-rise to promote dairy jobs

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A goat, a cow and a pig walk into a Tokyo high-rise.

The Japan Times
Aug 10, 2017

Excerpt:

A goat, a cow and a pig walk into a Tokyo high-rise.

It may sound like the start of a joke, but about 60 such animals have found a new home on the 13th floor of a building near Tokyo Station in the Otemachi district.

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August 12, 2017   No Comments

Switzerland: Allotments. My Plot Of Land

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Murat and Birsen Lavanur, from Turkey. “We have had the allotment for two years and we still have to learn a lot. Our kids can spend some time in nature and can run around freely.”

In Switzerland, amateur gardeners joined up to form associations, which led to the creation of a Swiss umbrella association in 1925. Now, 24,500 members and the equivalent of around 900 football fields belong to the Swiss Association of Allotment Gardeners.

Photographs and text, Ester Unterfinger, swissinfo.ch
Production, Felipe Schärer Diem, Sylvie Stark
Swiss Broadcasting Organization
Aug 8, 2017
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

For years, allotment gardens were considered a symbol of the Swiss bourgeoisie, but times have changed. Now, people of all nations appreciate them as place to withdraw and relax. Vito from Italy, Birsen from Turkey, Vaz from Portugal and other allotment enthusiasts talk about their individual plots of land.

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August 11, 2017   No Comments

Anchorage, Alaska urban farm teaches young employees life skill

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Within a 10,000 square foot warehouse in Spenard, rows of vertical hydroponic towers are tended to by a handful of young adult employees.

By Travis Khachatoorian
KYUU
Aug 4, 2017

Excerpt:

Johndro said she hires youth between the ages of 16 and 24 in needs of life skills.

“This is not a forever job,” said Johndro. “This is part-time, short-term, like six-months to a year, with a goal of moving on to a better more permanent job within the community.”

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August 11, 2017   No Comments

Edinburgh and Glasgow plan a community food growing revolution

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A team from Possil health centre in Glasgow tend to their allotment box. Picture: John Devlin/TSPL

Scotland’s largest local authority is already planning ahead by speaking with residents on how they can grow food in their own neighbourhoods.

By Chris Mccall
Scotsman
Aug 3, 2017

Excerpt:

The consultation by Glasgow City Council attracted hundreds of responses from individuals and community groups, the results of which will now be analysed before being presented to councillors.

“We are delighted with the level of response,” a council spokeswoman told The Scotsman. “This shows how excited Glaswegians are about all sorts of food growing opportunities.”

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August 11, 2017   No Comments

United Nations FAO event on community gardens and urban food production

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Watch the event.

See the 137 minute video of the full event at the UN in New York City.

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August 10, 2017   No Comments

Canada: 10,000 pounds of produce grown on Ryerson University own rooftop farm

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Click image to see larger file. Left to right: Ryerson University’s Urban Farm staff Agathe Chauvin, Jayne Miles, Kate Davies, Saba Zubair, Arlene Throness and Terri-Linn Zhou. By Samuel Engelking.

Downtown Toronto Rooftop

By Adria Vasil
Now
August 2, 2017

Excerpt:

Another locavore all-star. This past year, a whopping 50 per cent of the food dished out on campus came from “local, sustainable sources.” The most local of all? The 10,000 pounds of produce grown on Rye’s own rooftop farm and shared with their cafs and their Gould Street Farmers’ Market. Tuna salad lovers, rejoice: 99 per cent of their seafood is now certified sustainable. As with York University and pretty much every other campus using Aramark or Compass caterers, all their chicken should be more humane by 2024.

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August 10, 2017   No Comments

San Fransisco: Urban Agriculture or More Housing?

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The proposed community agriculture center. (Image: The Greenhouse Project) Click image to see larger file.

One block of greenhouses is all that remains of Portola’s garden industry, and its future is uncertain.

By Nuala Sawyer
SF Weekly
Aug 2nd, 2017

Excerpt:

The plot of greenhouses at 770 Woolsey St. was built in the 1920s, one of 19 that financially sustained the neighborhood’s population, which, at the turn of the 20th century, was largely immigrants from Malta and Italy. It was part of the University Mound Nursery, owned by the Garibaldi family, and these greenhouses somehow survived the neighborhood housing boom of the 1970s and ’80s, staying open until 1994.

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August 10, 2017   No Comments

Canada: B.C. gardeners dig into yard-sharing

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Rose Dykstra in the front yard of her Vancouver home on Aug. 5. Dykstra uses her front yard, and that of a neighbour, to grow flowers for her business, Front Yard Flower Co. By Jason Payne.

Regular homeowners who want to share their space with non-commercial gardeners can use the Young Agrarians U-Map to offer up their yards, and gardeners can look at the existing land listings.

By Randy Shore
Vancouver Sun
Aug 8, 2017

Excerpt:

Both Dykstra and Single-Dain lamented the existence of a dedicated Vancouver website for homeowners and gardeners interested in yard-sharing. Victoria-based LifeCycles Project hosted a yard-sharing website at sharingbackyards.com for several years and had expanded it to 58 cities before the platform collapsed.

“We were running without funding and I tried to write some grant applications while I scaled up,” said former project leader Chris Hawkins. “After the economic collapse it just got harder and harder to get grants, especially as we weren’t regarded as a startup.”

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August 9, 2017   No Comments